Seal bearing name of King Hezekiah found and deciphered in Jerusalem

Seal found from 2009 archeological dig deciphered in Jerusalem bearing name of King Hezekiah

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Israeli archeologists have deciphered a bulla found in a 2009 archeological excavations that bears the name of King Hezekiah. The seal, which was found in Jerusalem’s Old City, bears the inscription “Belonging to Hezekiah Ahaz King of Judah” and dates back to 727-698 BC.

The seal was found in the Ophel Archeological Park in Jerusalem, south of the Temple Mount during a Hebrew University excavation. According to head of the archeological dig, Dr. Eilat Mazar, “This is the first time that a seal impression of an Israelite or Judean king has ever come to light in a scientific archaeological excavation.”

Hebrew University released the statement on the finding “The bulla was discovered in a refuse dump dated to the time of King Hezekiah or shortly after, and originated in the Royal Building that stood next to it, and appears to have been used to store foodstuffs.”

King Hezekiah ruled the kingdom of Judah from Jerusalem, his reign during war and conflict with Assyria. In 2 Kings 18:5 it is written “He trusted in the Lord, the God of Israel; so that after him there was none like him among all the kings of Judah, nor among those who were before him.”